graffiti

Demo Digital Graffiti Wall

Tangible a talented Vancouver-based art and design studio dedicated to creating experiences and products created this digital graffiti demo. I love tooling interfaces so each time I see one of these graffiti demos in a different format I share them mostly for my own bookmarking purposes. Building tooling interfaces that empower users is probably one of the only reasons I continue my career in technology.

The Drone That Will Change Graffiti: An Interview with KATSU. KATSU is an artist and a vandal and a clever hacker too. His work pushes our idea of what can be achieved with the graffiti artist’s limited tool-set. Having established himself as one of New York City’s most prolific and imaginative taggers in the 1990s, he garnered admiration from the arts community (and condemnation from the authorities) when he pioneered the fire extinguisher spray can, which has permitted him to expand the scale of his art by orders of magnitude. He famously demoed it at “Art in the Streets,” a 2012 show at the the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, when, without invitation, he left his multi-story calling card on the side of the museum. Source

Graffiti Machine Produces Vibrant Rainbows

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In 2010, Swedish street artist Akay created Tool No. 10: Robo-Rainbow in an ongoing series of Instruments of Mass Destruction, which he further describes as “complicated technical solutions to aid in simple acts of vandalism.” Obviously, the words ”mass destruction’ are used lightly here, considering that the artist has no malicious intentions and ends up producing a bit of cheerful color on otherwise bare, deserted walls.

This particular device includes a long, mechanical arm holding six cans of spray paint and attached to a rotating device. With the machine extending back behind his bicycle, Akay can control the rotating arm with a remote control secured to the bicycle handle. When he pushes the button, the arm moves upward in an arc-path, spraying the bottles of paint and forming a graffiti rainbow along nearby walls. (Check out the video below to see the machine in action).

Akay says, “Everytime something is done on the street there is a level of interaction involved. Maybe its not the interaction we hoped for or expected, but every project is an invitation to respond. Even if the response is someone taking down what has been offered up.” The creation, assembly, action, and final product of the Tool No. 10: Robo-Rainbow are an amazing display of mechanical skill and creative thinking blending together into quick moments of unexpected, vibrant street art.

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Akay’s website

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Personally I think this is stupid. But hey glad marketing departments have money to burn cause thats what keeps us creatives in business. Watch as respected street artist Jeff Soto teams up with Chevrolet in an amazing world-first street-art collaboration.